Japan intends to build 9 new ammunition depots by the beginning of the new fiscal year

Japan intends to build 9 new ammunition depots by the beginning of the new fiscal year

The agency explained, citing informed sources, that these warehouses will be allocated to the Ground Self-Defense Forces, and will be built in four prefectures: Hokkaido, Miyazaki, Kagoshima, and Okinawa.

According to the agency, the Ministry of Defense expects to enhance its ability to carry out long-term combat operations by increasing the storage of ammunition, including long-range missiles that can be used to strike enemy bases.

Japan currently has 1,400 ammunition depots across the country, and 130 new depots are planned to be built by 2032.

It should be noted that last December, Japan adopted three main documents on defense and security: the “National Security Strategy,” which defines the main directions of foreign policy in the field of defense, the “National Defense Strategy,” which defines the goals and means of defense, and the “Defense Capability Plan.” Which determines the total defense expenditures and the scope of armaments.

The “National Security Strategy” and the “National Defense Strategy” stipulate the possession of “the ability to direct a retaliatory strike,” which implicitly means defeating enemy bases. Until now, this ability has been implicit in Japan’s right to self-defense but has not been made clear. This change marked a major shift in Japanese defense policy.

The Chinese Foreign Ministry summons the German ambassador to Beijing against the backdrop of Baerbock’s statements about Xi Jinping

The Chinese Foreign Ministry summoned the German Ambassador to Beijing, Patricia Flohr, against the backdrop of statements made by German Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock about President Xi Jinping.

A spokesman for the German Foreign Ministry explained today that this summons occurred on Sunday, while the Chinese Foreign Ministry considered Beabrook’s statements during her visit to the United States on the 14th of this month as a “political provocation,” as Beabrook described President Xi Jinping as a “dictator.”